Quick firing not an option in political sex-misconduct cases

Quick firing not an option in political sex-misconduct cases
FILE -- In this file photo from Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., attends a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., the top Democrat in the House, said today, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, that Conyers should resign, saying the accusations are "very credible." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, file)
Quick firing not an option in political sex-misconduct cases
In this Nov. 29, 2017 photo, Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., arrives at a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. An Army veteran has accused Franken of inappropriately touching her more than a decade ago while she was on a military deployment to Kuwait. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

NEW YORK (AP) — When sexual misconduct allegations surface in the private sector, a boss can say, "You're fired" — as Matt Lauer, Charlie Rose and others can attest. In the political world, it's never that simple.

Democratic Rep. John Conyers of Detroit has refused to step down, even after the party's House leader urged him to do so. Minnesota Sen. Al Franken intends to stay on. And Republican Roy Moore is pressing ahead with his Senate candidacy in Alabama despite allegations he sexually assaulted two teenage girls decades ago.

While private sector employees can be cut loose quickly, Congress rarely uses its authorities to expel members.

Politicians often try to hang on and retain the support of their base.

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